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do the reverse? >> what i say is that generally in the environment we're in thou, we're seeing a pick up in u.s. growth, pick up in chinese growth. we're starting to see a pick up in demand for key industrial commodities. i think at this point you're starting to see investors shift away from the cyclical commodities such as gold. >> it's shifting away from the nor defensive types of assets and even more in the commodities space moving more to the industrials. >> paladium, platinum up at seven-month highs. what is behind that? >> we're starting to see a pick up in growth in china and the u.s. the world's two largest economies. also you're seeing issues on the copper. there are a lot of problems in terms of getting these medals out of the ground. for platinum, 80% of it is produced in south africa. when you have labor issues, it has a big impact on supply. on the palladium side, we have the russian state slowing down substantially. it's stockpiled sales. you're seeing a squeeze -- >> supply side issues, as well. >> absolutely. and you're seeing a pick up in demand. that's been driving p
emotional? > > i think it is emotional because we grew up in an environment where most people didn't talk about money comfortably. second, it is an intersection between what you think and what you feel, and so there is this whole value confusion that occurs, and it always feels personal when somebody says you spend too much money or you don't know how to enjoy life. it feels very personal, and so knowing how to distance the emotions from the decision making is really important, or you will repeat this pattern of making the same mistakes over and over again. > what is the best way to bring up the topic of money in spending? > > the first is to do it in a non-charged environment. so what we would tell people is, have a scheduled time to do it. i meet with my wife of 20 years every week, but for most people once a month or once a quarter would be enough. second, make sure that you understand the other person's money mind, so that when you approach a sensitive area, you do it in their language. third, use a checklist. we have a check list - it's totally free - for individuals as well as for c
. risks will come down. but we're still in an environment where you need to focus on the risks out there. >> i don't think that's anytime soon. >> and that will be very important. >> i think investors need to focus on that down the road. for now, it's not going to be a factor pore probably most of the year, we would think. >> and i guess a little surprising is the economy feels like it's starting to turn. if you look at housing, if you look at what we hear from a lot of ceos about what's happening at this very moment, they feel okay with that. it's just when you ask them to give you guidance for the next quarter or the next year, they say they can't see that far. >> and i think it comes down to having things like the ee quester. certainly a reconciliation after the fact that the u.s. is spending so much more than it brings in. i think one of the interesting things, just around rates, bullard yesterday, for example, said that he expects 3% real growth this year. so 3% real growth and 2% inflation, that gets me to march like a 5% ten-year. we're nowhere close to that. lloyd blankfein was o
in the future saying this is a low growth environment. the new norm. as a result, they are all competing for the same market share, which typically, leads to pricing pressure. there's not a bigger pie growing. it's, rather, how do we slice up the pie today. >> spreeing to hear in light of the fact that the stock market is back to historic highs, but that's driven by profits of companies saying they may not have the leverage any longer. interesting to see they feel slower growth in the brick countries, but hope coming from beyond that. >> yeah, uh-huh. this year, the brick countries historically slowed down a little. you have optimism from china in the last six months, but they are moving into the next generation being a malaysia, indonesia, africa, turkey, and the like. corporates focus on that rise in consumer for opportunities to diversify the revenue stream and go after the growth. >> fascinating. look at the consumer at home and what's going on here and holding back, they are worried about the impact of higher taxes on the consumer. 77% of the american population saw the paycheck shr
in volume is really a natural occurrence in this environment. > you are just back from china. what did you find there? > > lots of pollution. i was in beijing for two days. i have been in china numerous times, and this was by far the worst i've ever seen it. but, aside from that, you look at the economy, things are moving. it is bouncing right along, and they are rebalancing the economy. you can see the service sector, the financial sector, different things moving. so i think in general things are moving in china. there is still a lot to be done and a lot of reform to be done, not the least of which is clean air and clean water. but i think these are things, initiatives to look forward to, and other than that, i think china is moving as expected, if not better. > we will take out our pollution put there tim. and what about the united states? what worries you about the market here? > > you know, not a lot worries me right now in this market. it is liquidity-driven. the fed is buying 80% of the treasury, which is unbelievable. i never thought i'd see that. so i think as long as that occurs,
environment to persist in 2013. >> reporter: a stronger euro makes imports of u.s. goods cheaper, and that could give some u.s. companies a boost in european sales. >> they'll get the most benefit from taking those euros that they earn abroad in europe and bringing them back home to the united states, where the currency has now become a little bit weaker. it'll have a little bit of a tailwind to their profits. >> reporter: much of the money printing in the u.s. and japan will likely pour into developing economies as investors hunt for bigger returns, but it could also inflate the currencies of those countries and create an asset bubble. >> the more monetary easing we see in the major economies, the more we are going to see a move towards interventionism and capital controls in the emerging economies. >> reporter: analysts say, come the g-20 meeting this weekend in moscow, any talk of a currency war will likely take place behind closed doors and away from the scrutiny of currency watchers. ruben ramirez, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: those tensions over foreign currencies will be
too in a negative real interest rate environment but we are a little bit more underweight this year than we were last year just because we think the risk of economic global calamity is certainly less than it was at this time last year. so don't see gold as strong as it was last year. david: kevin, this is what i don't understand about the current market. a lot of people say it is not going to be growing this year as much as it was last year. last year we had all the uncertainty. uncertainty about europe. uncertainty who would get elected in the state. uncertainty if the president was reelected what would happen with taxes. we have a lot of uncertainty nailed down or more or less so. we still have questions about the debt, et cetera. with more certainty now why isn't the market set to increase as much this year as it did last year? >> well, when you get, when you have more risk you have more reward, right? when you have more certainty, certainty l certainly we've seen a rally on that. but we would be surprised we saw the returns for 2013 like we did in 2012 because there was more unc
with that. now is a great time for opportunity. >> what about the idea that the regulatory environment is getting tougher from the epa to the financial regulators, dodd-frank, basel. business faces a different situation than decades ago. >> i don't think so. i remember acquisitions with at&t we didn't know. it was tough. we spent a great deal of time in the political and regulatory part of the business. it was touch and go. i'm not sure it change sod much. >> okay. what about the global story? people say in the last several decades, you know, american business was really riding a wave of globalization. today you're more likely to hear about jobs in buffalo and in michigan than in bangalore, india. are economies looking inward? >> i think so. there are some coming back. that's a good sign. >> you think it's a good sign that it's not the globalization openness we saw a few years ago and now economies are looking inward? >> glad to see us bring jobs back to this country and rethink that. that's helpful. >> final question. what do you drive? you driving a gm? >> i am driving a gtm cadillac
of domestic investors that usually have less demand to increase interest rates for the environment suggest so. >> okay. marco -- >> so at the end of the day, i don't see increase of interest expense drastic for japan in the medium term. >> right, right. well, that's the worry to some extent. but anyway, marco bardelli joining us from singapore. >>> meanwhile, the bank of hong kong did keep its benchmark rate steady overnight. still, suggestions about concerns over stimulus policies gives us some surprise. chery, what exactly did the bank of korea say about japan? >> although the bank of korea governor did not name japan and tried to stay diplomatic in the press conference today, he did say there are down side risks to the korean economy like a possible fiscal tightening by many countries and the issue of a foreign exchange rate. japan's aggressive monetary easing drive can take toll on korea's exports as they account for about half of the economy. and this on top of the recently weaker yen and the strengthening yuan that has hurt investor sentiment here on the kospi, particularly in the auto
, that it's special on the central bank to bring about an environment of price stability ask put the government on the central bank. understand that you need fiscal consolidation, you need price stability for long-term sustainable growth. there is, of course, difference of view in the short-term, a difference of perception depending on where you're sitting. but i don't think you should see that as a major division. international quart nation or at least a shared understanding on the implications of individual country policies, especially systemically important countries, domestic policies, lower impact on emerging economies. and i believe that advanced economies, systemically important economies must be sensitive to the lower impact of their policies. >> also speaking on the sidelines of the g-20, australia's deputy prime minister dismissed talk of a currency war, but did admit that a stopping aussie/dollar is a concern and key to australia's economy. >> we saw a huge crash in commodity prices in the second half of last year and that relied heavily on our revenues. and part and p
to believe them. melissa: how do you pick your bets in this environment? do you buy the index? do you buy etf? do you buy real estate? >> i like etf's. you know that. the symbol is rfp. it says if it is a broadening, rising market, you want to get into the goal weight etf's. you want to get the equal movement. melissa: david kotok, thank you so much for coming on. lori: senate democrats are offering an alternative plan. republicans already saying it does not stand a chance. here is rich and sends in washington with the latest. rich: congress settle taxes earlier this year. they are offering a minimum 30% effective tax rate for income for more than a million dollars. cutting spending on the military that appears to drop anyway. ending direct farm subsidies. the white house approves saying republicans in congress face a simple choice. do they protect investments and health care or do they continue to prioritize and protect tax loopholes that benefit the very few? republicans are waiting for the senate to vote first. >> when the senate passes a plan, we will be happy to take a look at it. until
that are better places to the entrepreneurs and others. >> we need to provide an environment that says we want you to do good business and create jobs but also going to support u.s. people in your own personal agendas to help your community and nation and someone. connell: what are you doing? >> united nations foundation made a commitment to entrepreneurs to help them stepped into not only their business but their philanthropy and using their technology and innovation to help solve global problems. connell: where are you making the most progress? are there surprising results? people would say go to the united states go to silicon valley there are plenty of entrepreneurs but are there other places where it is surprisingly you are seeing strong growth in entrepreneurs? >> in the development space is interesting, not just charity anymore but i am going to create some innovations that might save lives. if you look at malaria deaths have been cut in half in 11 countries in the last five years that is the cause technology of the long-lasting, entrepreneur created. connell: not just people throwing money
of the city, which was fountain square and environs. >> infrastructure. >> we had an infrastructure strategy. develop the banks, which is the river front. and begin to redevelop -- >> not your banks. the banks of the river. >> i was on board. >> the banks of the river. not the other banks. to your point, at the local level, a group came together, it was clearly in all of the stakeholders -- >> and that's a lot better than going to the federal government begging for that money and then the rest of the 49 states pay for it. >> it's all about leadership. if somebody has the courage, you know, to make a declaration about what winning might be, i think you'd be surprised at the number of americans that would stand up and stand behind it. >> so, a year ago, we'll just, you know, you did run. &g, we'd be remiss. >> three years ago. >> right. but a year ago, i looked at your successor and he was, i mean, there were -- did you make barbarians at the gate? who did you say made that up? >> eddie -- >> but he did and you got in trouble for saying it. anyway, for whatever reasons, mcdonald's was under as
' money other than stocks because of the low rate environment. andrew, how are you investing right now? >> well, we're probably going to go ahead and move in this market. looks like the pullback is more likely 1650 back to these levels. so more than likely now is probably the time to ease into the market. you've got tremendous momentum and breath here. you're fighting the tape, as they say. this is probably the time to deploy. >> meanwhile, rick santelli, the race to the bottom of the currency markets was interrupted today. horror of horrors. japanese officials saying they don't want the currency to go much lower. and the euro moving higher as well today. >> once you put that machine in motion, i don't know if you can stop it. and bill, i find it so telling you have so much more outrage about a maker's mark liquidity injection than the fed's liquidity injections. >> what's your point? >> that's a story for another day. because that's not good for either. a 20-year chart of the dollar index looks like it's going to be going at these levels for awhile. they look like they're going to sta
it can be an issue because it can cause an artificial barrier and can hurt the jobs environment. we would recommend that the administration focus on creating jobs. that will create demand for people and that will create a natural wage increase. look, the reality most markets minimum wage is irrelevant. you're paying people well above that. but it is a scenario we think the focus should be on job creation first and you will get demand for folks and that will raise wages for folks. liz: talk about expansions plans here in the u.s. and europe. you're building up all kinds of properties including a couple here in new york and these are high-end or upper scale hotels, correct? >> higher scale. liz: you only do that when you believe an economy is coming back. >> we do. barring something unforeseen that will set us going backwards from washington which we do not think we will we get, we think the hotel business will be in sight for a stronger run. not a lot of hotels coming on for 14 or 15. that should be a four or five-year good run. we'll start with the wind at your back. we hope for great thi
-- >> but how is he really going to propose a way of creating growth, creating an environment where those businesses that you talk about feel comfortable about hiring out of work americanses especially given 4lo-erjudis budget talk and everything, what you can really do? >> yeah, i think he's going to focus his attention on two areas. the first is energy development. i think he's going to make a big pitch for the u.s. as the energy power of the future, both in terms of renewable energies, green energy, and in terms of traditional energy, unconventional energ so i think one of his thes is going to be energy. the second is i think he's going to push two very big trade bills, one the transpacific partnership with asia and the second the transatlantic partnership with the european union, both of those to create confidence that those economies are going to recover and to insurance that the united states is right in the middle serving consumers in both those countries through creating jobs, creating employment, and agricultural output here at home. >> susie: the president is also expected to ta
that to last for long. >> the environment hasn't changed for gold. i think what were looking for at the moment is a specific catalyst that drives gold to the next level. >> reporter: rhind is keeping an eye on loose monetary policy around the globe, he's thinks those policies could cause currencies to weaken, making gold an attractive alternative. he's also watching gold supplies, which are currently tight. s&p capital i.q. thinks the precious metal could rise 15% this year, ending 2013 just below $2,000 an ounce. >> price forecasts like that could benefit gold miners, toronto-based alamos gold went public today, on the new york stock exchange. c.e.o. john mcclusky says demand, drove today's listing on the big board. >> it's an indication that we've grown to a stage where we could justify listing our symbol down here and actually command some investor attention. >> reporter: there are close to 80 small gold miners, each pumping out around 200,000 ounces of gold a year, and mcclusky says that makes the sector ripe for consolidation. >> if you can get three or four mines operating under the same
to the environment went to three ford vehicles: the f-350 and f-250 truck in their four- wheel drive versions and the e- 350 wagon van. it always pays to get behind the wheel of a car you want to buy before sitting down to negotate a deal. brian moody of autotrader.com joins us this morning with the insider's look. good to have you here. > > good morning. how are you? > you have named the new volkswagen beetle, dodge dart, cadillac ats, and nissan pathfinder as cars that you think are worth a test drive. what do you suggest for anyone taking a test drive in those cars, or any other car? > > what is important to remember is that if you are buying a car, there is no hurry. take your time. take a long test drive. the salesperson is going to want you to get in and get out quick, because they want to move on with their day and sell more cars. you should spend more time behind the wheel so you feel comfortable. also, what we like to do is bring our families, bring our stuff, our kids, our booster seats, our strollers. make sure all of that fits in the car so that the car fits your lifestyle. that w
's a lot of money. you have to put it somewhere. >> if you're going to wait for the political environment to get better, you're going to be an old man. >> you can't wait for washington. get on with running your business. it's filibustering over hagel adds more fuel to the fire. >> yeah. >> so you just have to get on running your business. we haven't seen any change in climate behavior. also there's a better mood, we have not seen that translate into significant change for climate behavior. we think 2013 will be similar to 2012 because we did have the olympics and the presidential election. which you remember. >> i remember. >> you remember the results closely. it will be similar to 2013. digital will be strong. data, technology will be strong. but same general tone. so we don't see the real world having changed at all, really. >> there's one other -- oh, okay, we're going to go to the weather. but berkshire in adm. >> berk share made some new moves. you have new people making investment decisions there, too, todd and ted. but as for berkshire hathaway, it did take a new state and aerch mi
be potentially serious problem. you have to realize this is a captive audience. this is a closed environment. and many things could potentially go wrong. in general, carnival and all the other cruise lines are very good about dealing with these situations. >> i know you're a doctor and not an attorney, but i'm wondering if the illnesses that came as a result are real enough to where any kind of lawsuits would have a standing chance in court? >> again, i'm definitely not an attorney, but in general, there's a possibility that they could prove a case. anyone that flies or drives or gets in a ship knows there are a risks to that. this is kind of an unusual situation, but i would say the litigation would be handled appropriately. >> doctor, while the passengers may have gotten off the ship, are there any sort of lingering concerns out there? could there be illnesses or injuries that develop after they've left the ship? >> that's a great question. potentially, i would be careful to look for bacterial infections, diarrhea. people could be very stressed about this afterwards. post-traumatic stress
significantly, down 7.3%, at $13.16 a share. talking about their environment, obviously, there's a tough environment trying to sell old-school books and compete with amazon. you talk e-readers, and that's putting them under pressure today and the nook. talk about the nook and outlook, they talk about a loss for 2013, more than expected, more than of a loss than they thought, and as a result, the stock is tanking. back to you. >> thank you very much, nicole. leapfrog jumping ahead. profit up 90% year over year, and sales rising 16% in the fourth quarter could be a 28% pop in full year revenue. john bash -- john barber, the ceo, you had earnings, down 20% in six months. what's wrong with the picture? >> well, it's actually 70% in 12 months -- >> you joined the company, i believe? >> two years ago. we had four of the top ten selling products last year. i'm a holder of leap frog and excited. i believe the market will have the opportunity in the near future. >> the company came up with the first leap pad, in i think, 1999 or so, surprised they didn't have the ipad, coasted on your coat tails,
in a deleveraging environment. many of the plans have yet to be put in place. we're definitely making progress. the markets should generally be moving higher but moving to fast to far on a near-term basis can cause some weakness and some pullback on the near-term basis. so we've been very much a advocate of kind of a cautiously constructive of positioning for portfolios for investors as a whole. not hiding in cash and treasurys but not necessarily jumping up and down on every stock we see. ashley: what fits the bill when you're cautiously optimistic and you kind of want to hedge your bets a little bit? >> what this means, we're trying to take selective risks. we're taking risks. we want clients to take risks. it is not hide under the covers and just own cash. but taking selective risks means you're not taking blind equity risk. that means buying some credit risk. high yield bonds. bank loans. international emerging marketing market debt. all these of those are attractive opportunities right now on a long-term basis. within equities, find your protection there. actually be more defensive in equ
't is because what they say in that article was untrue, but those statements hurt this company in an environment an in an industry that are sensitivity. dennis: david, we have to move faster. 95% of the workers were not at the company when the union vote happened 20 years ago. now, what gives the union the right to come in 20 years later saying, hey, we're your representative? >> the union's position essentially is that it is certified until desert mid, -- decertify, and until they are desert my by a vote of the workers, than can continue to represent the workers even to the election was more than two decades ago. dennis: must be nice. we ran a screen showing they treat workers well, pay $10 an hour, give scholarships to the children, and the ufw is dying on the vine, 20,000 members in 2000, and now fewer than 5,000. is this a bid by the united farm workers to double or triple the size because they are up to 12,000 employees at peak harvest season. >> well, when you count both direct hires and contractors, that's the right number, about 12,000. the consequences of imposing agreements on workers
well trying to push into the environment of much more thoughtful progressive policies about these issues the. >> they have lots of money, though. so those are very successful companies. and you could argue because your doing some of the things you're augusting. >> no question. >> take me to a company that's struggling been take me to a company that can't afford to give out free food throughout the day and free massages throughout the day. >> they're not going to let people sleep for two hours in a room somewhere, are they? >> no. but this is make missing the point. until you make this intellectual shift, more hours means more productivity. even one less hour of sleep gives us one more hour to be productive. that's nonsense. what it gives us is one more hour to by be partially productive because you're tired. >> do you think europe is productive? >> they rest a lot over there. >> you've got naps after lunch, you work a slightly longer day, but it's -- >> it's overdetermined. there are too many factors going on for me to answer that question and the german economy is very diff
see a lot more of a, you know, much more competitive wholesale environment this quarter. >> corinna, would you recommend buying the shares here? >> it is a little difficult to recommend starting new positions, but we most certainly would be holding on if we did own it already. >> all right. great to speak with you. thanks for your time. >> thank you. >>. >>> when we come back, what does art cashin want to hear from the president in tonight's state of the union? he'll tell us here at post 9. one more look at futures on this fat tuesday. we'll try to let the good times roll when "squawk on the street" comes right back. [ kitt ] you know what's impressive? a talking car. but i'll tell you what impresses me. a talking train. this ge locomotive can tell you exactly where it is, what it's carrying, while using less fuel. delivering whatever the world needs, when it needs it. ♪ after all, what's the point of talking if you don't have something important to say? ♪ how do traders using technical analysis streamline their process? at fidelity, we do it by merging two tools into one. combi
'i thi creating the underpinning of a significantly inflationary environment. >> do you think, sam, the training wheels, if they came o off, if the fed training wheels would come off we would continue along the same way, there's any positive effects from the fed action right now? >> i'm not sure i understand what you mean by the training wheels. >> we had an economy that went into a deep recession. we came out and we needed help nor a while. there's a lot of people that thought we had enough help, the big stimulus package and compare action by the fed. last year, it seemed like the economy is getting some traction and a lot of people are surprised when the fed even ramped up their efforts. do you know something we don't snknow in the economy? isn't an economy supposed to finally exist on itself? they seem to think that it couldn't. do you think it could? >> i don't think there's any question it could. it has for 200 years. >> at 8% unemployment, that's not grow iing -- i guess they think as long as there's people that need jobs, we will stay in there. >> two years, three years ago
, these are difficult environments as opposed to houston where you can do whatever you want, whenever you want to. >> right. >> so i think that the rental housing market i think is going to continue to be very strong. like it was too good and then everybody had to come up with a reason why it wasn't. >> is the home mortgage deduction going to come back on the table? does that have anything to do with the rental issue you're talking about? >> i actually think home mortgage deductions are going to come back on the table. i think they're going to ultimately either be eliminated as they were in canada, and when they were eliminated in canada, everybody said, oh, my god, it's the end of the housing market, and it was hardly a blip. or it will be cut to deductions on the first $100,000 or something, so you're effectively protecting the middle class. >> thank you for this. >> yeah, sam, it has been a pleasure having you here today. >> my pleasure. >> we really appreciate hearing from you. sam zell has been our guest host for the last two hours. you're putting your money where your mouth is. it's all abo
opportunity to grow our advisory business. we saw that last year in an environment when mna activity was down 9% globally. our advisory fees were up approximately 30%. so we're taking market share in a skig cant way. >> and you're expecting dealing this year? >> i think we would expect, you know, you never know. would i put my money or own or under? i would put my money on over. >> all right. you're a betting man. ralph, good to have you on our program. ralph schlosstein. >>> again refusal to raise taxes as part of a deal to avoid automatic spending cuts. tom cole will speak with me about the brewing battle in the national's capitol. >>> a fury erupts after a company tells customers they're watering down its bourbon. stay with us. [ male announcer ] any technology not moving forward is moving backward. [ engine turns over, tires squeal ] and you'll find advanced safety technology like an available heads-up display on the 2013 lexus gs. there's no going back. >>> welcome back. less than three weeks until automatic budget cuts kick in which will trigger job losses and perhaps an economic setbac
. that's easy to do in this upcoming environment if you have people starting to say you know what? i've been in money markets for too long. where else can i put my money? and they don't want to put it in the same bonds that you and i don't like. but they're going to put it in -- >> the profits of stocks. and profits are still outperforming. >> it's money printing. listen. in january the japanese government said we will print unlimited -- that's their quote -- unlimited amounts of money. so dr. bernanke said i can match that. i'll put up another $45 billion a month. a month. you know how much that is? he's spending over a trillion dollars a year of money printing. >> it ain't bad if you own stocks. >> it's making stocks go up. japanese markets are up more. >> we can be intellectually accurate. but in the meantime, it's a powerful wall of liquidity and we have to respect it. i think for our clients make money for them. >> we got to get out of here. jim rogers, thank you. the book "street smarts." available now. thanks to zane brown and bob doll. >>> white house says it's going to pivot
? and the point i always try to make to them is particularly in this current environment is that if you are an owner of cash, not for the short term, if you've got a bill that you need to pay in three or four month, cash is the right place for you, but if you have your longer term money in cash, you're lose 2:00% to inflation every year. we've had a lost decade for cash already. you've lost 8% of purchasing power in the last ten years, and we're having to have another lost decade for cash going forward so time horizon is very important. >> i guess, i mean, one issue though would be am i going to be able to get into this market at lower levels, quint tetreault, so what's your feeling on that? yes, i mean, i get it that valuations are attractive. i get it that there are very few alternatives out there given where rates are, but are there still enough cat lifts that are going to be a problem that send this market lower and enable me to get into better prices? >> i think -- >> i think there is, maria. >> i'm sorry. >> sure. i think there is, maria. we've seen it. the last several years, we'
of the economic environment. i like to look for big picture themes. we have a much broader trend. take the move toward healthy eating. embrace natural and organic foods. this organic theme made whole foods a power house stock. of course, it also destroyed the regular supermarkets. the same thing goes for hain celestial. it's not the average consumer packaged goods company. however, while these stories can last for years, even secular growth trends in the end have a limited shelf life. you see these themes age, is that there are fewer and fewer plays had a can consistently make you money, but they never last forever. when the smart phone was a recent invention, i started talking about the power of the mobile internet tsunami. and for a while, boy, there was a ton of money to be made over the smart phone food chain as people converted from dumb phone to smart phone. but really the tsunami turned out to be the reason to buy the best of breed players like apple. it turned out not to be a license to buy even the weakest players which fell by the way side as we learned, a rising tide does not lift al
madoff out there? they certainly have perspective on regulatory environment and improvements made or not made since then. >> how much cost? >> roughly $600 million, if you add administrative cost close to $700 million in fees. that's paid by wall street, by you and me if we invest. >> $700 million to reclaim $9 billion. >> which they say is a decent investment. >> thank you very much. >>> ahead on the program, intel and netflix both unveiling big plans to be front and center on your tv set. julia borsten at a media conference in laguna niguel, california. >> that's right, simon, digital and tech giants here and making big moves to own a piece of the future of television. i'll tell you about intel and netflix announcements coming up after the break. look, if you have copd like me, you know it can be hard to breathe, and how that feels. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. spiriva
moving into an environment where the banks are coming in better. and i think that brings up the question, then, why do you want to hold gold? you would want to hold something more -- >> definitely overbought. but they can go on overbought in a while. that could be 20% from here. i don't know. but clearly, a lot of people have checked in and they're all in one trade and they're all talking about the same thing, they're all writing the same thing. it's a bit worrying in a slightly bigger picture. >> plenty of interesting thoughts there to talk about. this day with the chinese new year, the snowstorm for the united states. there's no immediate crisis going on. it's just finding their feet. >> really quiet. and i think the cypress story is fascinating. take a look at some of the details. 0.2% of total output. but the real question becomes, do you make depositors and bondholders share in the losses? >> of course. >> for everyone else. >> keep an eye on that. european markets, it's not as if they're selling off. as we turn to the u.s. session, usair lines are expected to return to near normal
. in that kind of environment, you may be better off trying to grow through acquisition than you are organically. so i think we're going to see more of this. i think it is good for sentiment as you point out. i don't know that it triggers a new wave of overall optimism, but i think it is a good support for the market. >> what do you think of the buffett heinz deal? the price, you know, does it matter? i mean, he's paying up a bit. does that matter for him? >> it doesn't really matter for him. you know, this is classical buffett. he's buying a great brand, good cash flow, growth opportunity and he is the classical long-term investor. so for him to absorb a little bit of a premium to get the kind of property that he wants is not an issue at all. this is classical buffett. he's sitting on a lot of cash. he says he's really to reload and do it again if he can find a good property. he'll absorb whatever ream yumm he's paid over time and it will be a good day. >> and he was upping his stakes in directv, american express and is gm, interestingly enough. gm has got a -- they've got a european division t
're undervalued on our analysis. if we're right about the economic environment starting to stablize some of that undervaluation will close in the coming year. ashley: very good. lots of information. michael jones, thanks so much for joining us. we appreciate it. >> my pleasure. tracy: here at home, president obama's state of the union address tomorrow night. he is expected to pivot back to the economy. this sound a little like yogi berra's deja vu all over again. you're not alone. rich edson in washington with the details. rich, where has he been that is not on the economy. >> well the administration says the state of the union will be a focus on jobs and the economy as the president has been discussing for the last couple of weeks and real emphasis on gun control and immigration reform and a second inaugural address was more about overreaching defense or overarching defense of liberal policies and progressivism. the prompted the republican national committee to say obama is pivoting back to the economy for the past five years as the white house has announced that as a focus repeatedly.
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